Who was Thor Heyerdahl?

Thor Heyerdahl was most famous for his exploits on the Kon-Tiki raft, which he sailed across the Pacific Ocean, however, there was much more to his life than that.

This site gives an overview of his life: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thor_Heyerdahl

When he died in 2002, obituaries lauded him around the world, for example: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2002/04/0419_020419_wirethor.html & http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/science-obituaries/1391410/Thor-Heyerdahl.html

How do maps affect our impressions of reality? An example from London Underground

If you are asked to imagine the London Underground layout, this is probably what you visualise:

However, this fly through from DigitalUrban shows things in a different and more realistic way:

http://vimeo.com/3557226

In contrast, this “flipped” version of the tube map shows how connected the south of London would be were the outline of the tube network rotated on an east-west axis:

http://www.colourcountry.net/images/south-london-underground.png

Is online mapping changing the way we view our nation?

A leading cartographer has spoken out against internet mapping, such as Google Maps, saying that by leaving off key historical and geogrpahical features, they are destroying the Country’s understanding of itself:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7586789.stm

Can Geography save your life?

It certainly can. Watch this video about a girl who had learnt the warning signs associated with a tsunami and was able to save her family on December the 26th 2004:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E0yrONL1Q3g

How can maps help the police tackle crime?

Maps showing where crimes occur are a powerful tool in helping police around the world spot patterns and create strategies for crime reduction. This website, run by the Metropolitan Police, shows where crimes occur in London:

http://maps.met.police.uk/

What can we learn by looking at Britain from above?

The BBC has commissioned a series called Britain from Above, which aims to show how Britain operates today, the links between landscapes and uses, how these can be mapped and interpreted and how these uses have changed over time. Sounds like Geography to me, so why do the BBC use the word so infrequently?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/britainfromabove/

Where is Matt?

How many countries can you see?